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January 24 - February 21

Cathy Hegman & Dora Pinon

 

 

 Cathy Hegman

 

Dora Pinon

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Cathy Hegman:  Dora Pinón

Opens January 24:  Through February 21, 2014

TEW Galleries: Two powerful contemporary female painters:

Cathy Hegman uses the figure and landscape to create an intense interplay of space and narrative. Her figures are a mix of negative and positive, simultaneously shadow and form. As such, the work presents questions about the veracity of all that we experience. If personality is projected as a void but gesture as a form, what does this mean? Conversely, if space as indicated by landscape is in our own experience ‘spacious' when space becomes truncated by both perspective and mark where do we find respite? The tensions set up between the representation of figure and landscape is the basis for an interesting body of work. In her current exhibition the figures exist in a more complete relationship with landscape, to the point that they become potent, almost totemic statements of a continuous loop between water, earth and sky.

Dora Pinón, a Spanish artist who lives and paints in Madrid looks at chairs - subjects that are familiar to all of us, but which she infuses with a painterly energy that takes them far beyond comforting pieces of furniture and decorative components of interior design.  In choosing this subject Pinón, a serious artist with a love of both abstraction and figuration, challenges her own ideas about art using décor as a vehicle to question and comment on serious painting.  Her art is in fact the suspension of any predefined outcome as she allows the act of painting to take over.  Pinón uses color and bold, emotional brushstrokes to do away with her, and hopefully our, preconceived notions of what painting and chairs are, and in the process turns them into far more than we considered them both to be before.  In this way her comfortable chairs are less nurturing and contemplative than they are a place where the robustness of life is lived out unapologetically, and with creative energy and enthusiasm aplenty point the way to her unique talents.

 

 

February 28 - March 28

Serhiy Hai & Petro Lebedynets

 

Serhiy Hai

 

Petro Lebedynets

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Sergiy Hai:  Petro Lebedynets

Opens February 28:  Through March 29, 2014

TEW Galleries: The February - March schedule features two of Ukraine’s most important contemporary artists.

In the fall of 2013 Timothy Tew traveled to meet with artists in Ukraine.  As a result TEW Galleries will present a show of Sergiy Hai and Petro Lebedynets, two of Ukraines most important contemporary artists.  This will be Hai’s third solo show at TEW Galleries and Lebedynets debut exhibition.  Both were born in the late 1950s and have gained important reputations extensively exhibiting for many years in Ukraine, Russia, Eastern and Western Europe and the United States.  In addition both are in museum collections in Ukraine and in private collections in Eastern and Western Europe and the United States.

Sergiy Hai:  Hai’s third exhibition at TEW Galleries will feature mellow paintings and strong ink wash drawings. The scope of Hai’s typical imagery is quite narrow—he paints and draws nudes, figures in pairs, equestrian works and still lifes.  These few themes are revisited over and over again in infinite variety and brought to life through his intimate perspective and impressive technique.  Through a unique application of paint and the use of smoky rich colors Hai creates images and luscious satin-like surfaces that seem to float, like a dream, in another reality.  Hai’s approach to painting is unpretentious, quick and carefree, displaying both his love of beautiful line, cherished settings and evocative chromatism.  His art invites viewers to join his reverie by suggesting outcomes, yet leaving the narrative squarely in the observer’s own imagination.

 Petro Lebedynets:  The forceful and lyrical abstract paintings of Lebedynets’ first exhibition will astound.  Covering his canvases with brightly colored, heavily textured, thick, opaque oils; Lebedynets’ paintings glow like the moon.  Lebedynets believes that color is perceived through intuition and that only through the refinement of consciousness do we reach higher into the non-material essence of matter.   Through his unique painting process he makes this more accessible to us because his luminous hues recall our identification with the heavens and the seas.  Lebedynets, like Hai, creates pictures that require our participation, but having given us everything necessary to want to conjure up our own conclusions, this makes them complete and universes unto themselves.  

These two very different yet kindred artists affirm the statement of Anatole France: “Artists have to show us how good life is.  Otherwise we would have some doubts.” 

 

 

May 2 - June 9

Abstraction Today

A Group Show Featuring: Maxey Andress,   Clem Bedwell,  Jean Glenn,  Petro Lebedynets,  Genie Maples,  Melissa Mason,   Kimo Minton,   Richard Olsen,   Eric Reinemann  &  Whitney Wood Bailey

  

  

  Jean Glenn  

  

  

 Kimo Minton 

 

 

  Richard Olsen

 

  

Whitney Wood Bailey

 

Contemporary Abstraction:  Group Exhibition

Opens May 2nd:  Through June 9, 2014

TEW Galleries’ exhibition Contemporary Abstraction features works by ten artists; Maxey Andress, Clem Bedwell, Jean Glenn, Petro Lebedynets, Yasharel Manzy, Melissa Mason, Kimo Minton, Richard Olsen, Eric Reinemann and Whitney Wood.

The process of abstraction takes the form of a conscious search for a characteristic that forms the essential kernel, or truth, within a concept or an object. Abstraction; then, becomes the essence of something; apart from its physicality. It can take the form of a distillation of a physical object, or element, or stem from something visionary and have no reference to, or basis in, reality.

All ten artists bring their own visual language to the exhibition and the only real linking factor is the passion and energy which each finds in the work they do. We hope you will find the time to come by and experience the depth of this show.

Maxey Andress’ mixed media abstract works on wood and paper bring strong color and a masculine energy to the show. His structural panels carry a sense of nostalgia for the sixties and seventies, but, with its reflection upon both technology and nature, this body of work is based strongly within our current times.

Clem Bedwell has been showing with TEW since 2007. Bedwell’s paintings are inspired by nature, but take the form of highly abstracted statements of light and shadow. His use of color tends to pull from the harmonies and dramas inherent in the atmosphere but it is in the taught balancing of light and dark that these works find their visual vibration and affirming energies.

Jean Glenn’s polychrome abstract paintings are reminiscent of densely populated urban or cellular environments. Her tightly woven marks and complex color combinations form into surfaces both highly detailed & painterly. The viewer’s relationship to these paintings becomes increasingly intense as, on closer approach, the surfaces draw the eye in to an ever tighter contemplation of the work.

Petro Lebedynets:  The forceful and lyrical abstract paintings of Lebedynets’ first exhibition will astound. Covering his canvases with brightly colored, heavily textured, thick, opaque oils; Lebedynets’ paintings glow like the moon.  Lebedynets believes that color is perceived through intuition and that only through the refinement of consciousness do we reach higher into the non-material essence of matter.   Through his unique painting process he makes this more accessible to us because his luminous hues recall our identification with the heavens and the seas.  Lebedynets, like Hai, creates pictures that require our participation, but having given us everything necessary to want to conjure up our own conclusions, this makes them complete and universes unto themselves. 

Melissa Mason is passionate about the bold forms and lyrical lines of equines. Her paintings take from the essence of these animals, often on a large scale. The essential shapes or lines of movement that she sees in her subjects are mapped out with loose brush marks on canvas allowing us to feel the power of the horse rather than being treated to an anatomical likeness. These works are formally as much about surface, mark, color and gesture as they are about the animal they represent, but they retain that indelible spirit of the creature in much the same sense as that captured by prehistoric cave artists of Europe and Africa.

Kimo Minton shows new polychrome woodcut panels. These works form a powerful ethnographic commentary that draws intuitively on woodcut techniques that have been in use for centuries. What sets this artist apart from others is both the unusual technique and the highly personal visual narrative that Minton has developed. Minton scores, gouges, cuts and sands to create sensual painted surfaces overlying the ‘bones’ of the carving beneath. These works, while abstract in nature, are deeply rooted in the human condition. The lyrical use of line and shape juxtaposed with strong areas of color bisected with delicate cut marks creates works that are as interesting close up as they are viewed from afar.

Richard Olsen; a retired art professor from the University of Georgia, came to notice after the Vietnam War when he translated his experiences into large scale abstract paintings that dealt with the concepts of transforming personal experience into a partitioned and segmented series of colors, images and shapes that either resonated with, or visually charged adjacent areas. More recently, Olsen has transformed his focus into something more organic and sensual while still maintaining his fascination with geometric abstraction. An embedded expressionistic narrative runs like a thread throughout his works, which use as subject, the walls of his studio, and the canvases stacked against, or hanging on it.

Whitney Wood Bailey explores themes of a metaphysical nature such as how design and orchestration within nature affects our consciousness. The dramatic large scale mixed media works on paper have all the verve and energy of Wood-Bailey’s canvasses but the moments of happenstance – a random spattering of inks and the fading values of layering water based paint on paper adds a quality of immediacy and intimacy, as if you can actually see the artist at work. The artist, who did her MFA at SCAD Atlanta, now works and lives in New York.

 


 

June 20 - July 25, 2014  

Contemporary Landscapes
A Group Show
 

Brett Deschene, Calvin Jones, Cathy Hegman, Claude Bauret Allard, Chuck Bowdish, Clem Bedwell, Deedra Ludwig, Greg Gustafson, Isabelle Melchior, Stewart Helm & Yasharel Manzy

  

 

 Greg Gustafson

 

 

 

 Clem Bedwell

 


Deedra Ludwig

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 20: Through July 25, 2014 

Contemporary Landscapes:  Group Exhibition

Contemporary Landscapes at TEW Galleries features works by eleven artists; Claude Bauret-Allard, Clem Bedwell, Chuck Bowdish, Brett Deschene, Cathy Hegman, Stewart Helm, Calvin Jones, Deedra Ludwig, Yasharel Manzy and Isabelle Melchior.

The title of this show references the differences of vision that artists bring to a common subject. We, each and every one of us, relate to landscape on a visceral level; it is part of our common history; our DNA, if you like, in that our survival and success as a species has relied upon our relationship to “land.”  It is only since the early 18th century that we began our inexorable pull back from an agrarian culture and today we commonly view landscape as something picturesque – to be enjoyed while on vacation rather than on an intimate level.  Artists, by looking more deeply however, bring a different focus to our common understanding. The process of selection, isolation, or abstraction, when it comes to dealing with landscape as a subject, manifests as a conscious search for a personal idyll in some cases, or, of a commentary on the state of things, in others. Abstraction; for some, becomes the essence of landscape; a notation or map of the physicality of the world as they find it. These artists distill the physical world around us into a record of their personal vision of what landscape means, as much as what it is.

Claude Bauret-Allard is a French artist whose paintings in pastel focus on the environment around her country home in Sperecèdes. These most recent works pare the landscape down to haunting images of shifting densities as they focus on light at sunset, the cool mists of dawn, or nightfall as it renders subtle contrasts in reflectivity.

Clem Bedwell’s abstract paintings are inspired by reflections on water and one gets the sense of how air causes water to shape-shift as light and color seem to move across the canvas. These are fundamentally meditative works filled with gentle visual vibration, affirming energies and a distinctly Zen sensibility.

Chuck Bowdish presents landscape as reflection of human condition. In proportion to the figures, whose small size makes them seem vulnerable, the landscape with its painterly marks, truncated space and minimal references is vast and powerful. At other times subject and landscape come together more intimately; setting up a poetic narrative of benign relationships in an idealized world of children, trees and birdbaths. Bowdish’s gentlest paintings are both compelling and delicate as if reverential of far greater unseen powers but his use of paint, when unleased by emotion, makes his paintings unforgettable. 

Brett Deschene works in encaustic (wax) medium and oil over a tiled collage of archival photographs. It is not only his medium that sets this artist’s work apart from the rest of the show, but the dream-like quality of the images he brings into being. Lonely roads edged by trees, are given a sense of nostalgic longing by the photographically inspired cyan, selenium and sepia colorations he employs, as well as the vignette around the edges of the works. His paintings speak of self-discovery through exploring nature and also, in a more oblique way, about the passage of time.

Cathy Hegman uses the figure and landscape to create an intense interplay of space and narrative. Her figures are a mix of negative and positive; simultaneously shadow and form. As such, the work presents questions about the veracity of all that we experience. If personality is projected as a void but gesture as a form, what does this mean? Conversely, if space as indicated by landscape is in our own experience ‘spacious,’ when space becomes truncated by both perspective and mark where do we find respite? In these current works the figures exist in a more complete relationship with landscape to the point that they become potent, almost totemic statements of a continuous loop between structure, earth and sky. 

Stewart Helm:  Exotic and delicately rendered landscape sketches made by Helm while travelling in Spain, Argentina and Italy, embrace the simple forms and organic line that he is best known for. These small works, however, are simply lush with resplendent color that give them a vibrancy that holds up against far larger pieces. They have all of the allure of heady spices in oranges and saffron, burgundy and emerald.

Calvin Jones:  The artist’s moody, interpretive landscapes range from a very personal pictorial form to one that pushes the boundaries further by adding layers of abstraction into what we think of as a traditional subject. Jones paints landscapes and the interplay of light; but the tonalities shift from deep brooding shadows to buoyant highlight effects and flicks or drips of paint describe both the subject and the surface in a very personal way. An accomplished painter, Calvin Jones brings a depth and passion to his paintings that lifts the viewer’s soul.  

Deedra Ludwig is a painter whose life has mirrored her art, and vice versa. A committed environmentalist with a deep love of nature; Ludwig weaves these interests through her work. Her paintings exude light while fragmentary plant forms float within the color field or seem to rise out of the color and project beyond the surface itself. This is only partly visual effect as Ludwig incorporates actual plant forms into the body of the work and by embedding them into thin layers of encaustic the integration of the physical with the ephemeral becomes seamless. Ludwig celebrates nature while simultaneously preserving it.

Yasharel Manzy is known for his painterly landscapes and bold abstract works. Using rich, warm toned color and fluid brush marks, Yasharel captures the essence of the Mediterranean countryside that so inspires him. His painterly technique, seductive color and blithe messaging combines to create accessible paintings with great joie de vivre. He moves easily between narrative works and abstraction and his landscapes are more indicative of the love and imagination of painting than of staying true to any particular scene or locale.

Isabelle Melchior once again addresses the subject of landscape with her elegant and loosely rendered pastel sketches of Jacqueville; the site of her beloved country home. In these works one senses the intimacy of a place perfectly understood and deeply held. The works breathe; redolent of spring blossoms on a breezy day or hot summer sunshine. Melchior, as always, brings the viewer into her own familiar world with the welcome of a gracious host.

 

 

August 8 - September 

 

WORKS ON PAPER

A Group Show: Maxey Andress, Chuck Bowdish, Arless Day, Serhiy Hai, Stewart Helm, America Martin, Melissa Mason, Kimo Minton, Emil Robinson, Sarah Wolfe, Olena Zvyagintseva

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Chuck Bowdish

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Serhiy Hai

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Works on Paper: Group Exhibition

Opens August 8th: Through September 5, 2014

Works on Paper at TEW Galleries features works by eight artists: Maxey Andress, Chuck Bowdish, Arless Day, Serhiy Hai, Stewart Helm, Sarah Wolfe, Emil Robinson and Olena Zvyagintseva will all have several works on show. (Selected works by several other artists in addition to those featured may hang in the exhibition.)

Both artists and viewers experience works on paper differently than they do more tactile mediums. There is a level of intimacy about work on paper; an expressiveness and immediacy which is difficult, if not impossible, to reproduce in ‘slower’ paint mediums. The physicality of working on paper is different – it is closer, less edited or re-worked and happenstance is embraced. Of course, this statement doesn’t apply to tightly handled works which emphasize technique or subject, but the contradictions highlight the wonder of works on paper. Like stumbling across an intimate diary which gives insight into the secret yearnings of the soul, drawings give a firsthand sense of the artist in the moment of creation and allow the viewer to sense in a very tangible way, the explorations of the hand that created the piece.

Maxey Andress is an Atlanta artist whose abstractions are a tour de force of perfectly controlled handling of medium and mark. This is work for the collector who appreciates technical excellence and the artist’s understanding of shape and color transformed into complex relationships and subtle interactions.

Chuck Bowdish, in contrast, presents a series of works that reflect upon human condition. His collage drawings consist of bold figural statements played out in a strange and highly staged tableau of juxtaposed items, buildings and figures. Bowdish layers and joins paper; “piecing” the works together in a seemingly casual way, often culling sections of different drawings and re-configuring them. His use of brush, pen and ink, combines loose drawing, bold and quick cross hatch or stipple and areas flooded with dense black paint, creating a tension within the drawing that counterbalances the gentle characterization of the figures.

Arless Day works in acrylic over a tiled collage of photographic constructions. His pieces relate more to painting than drawing and consist of an idealized construction/deconstruction of interior scenes complete with intimate personal details; a family dog, musical instruments or the view from a window. Rather than present a realistic representation of space he abstracts it by simultaneously combining several different viewpoints.

Serhiy Hai: A well-known Ukrainian painter, Hai again embraces his ongoing interest in the human figure with this series of studies in ink and pastel. There is no doubt that his grasp of human form is singular as he quickly render these monochromatic sketches that so elegantly define the models he works with. The sure application of ink wash, instinctive and lyrical marks and a tangible sense of personality are so descriptive that the viewer has no doubt that the resulting sketches are made from life models.

Stewart Helm: Exotic and delicately rendered landscape sketches made by Helm while travelling in Spain, Argentina and Italy, embrace the simple forms and organic line that he is best known for. These small works, however, are simply lush with resplendent color that give them a vibrancy that holds up against far larger pieces. They have all of the allure of heady spices in oranges and saffron, burgundy and emerald.

Sarah Wolfe: An accomplished oil painter and draughtsman, Wolfe brings a classical sensibility to her works on paper. In her current series of pastel on paper ‘portraits’ the artist’s imaginings transcend both time and personality to become almost mythically beautiful. Delicately proportioned and exquisitely worked, her pieces make use of subtle texture, line work and shading, to almost romantic effect. 

Emil Robinson: New to TEW Galleries, Robinson’s pastel on paper figurative works reflect an entirely contemporary viewpoint and approach. His slice-of-life vignettes capture women in situations we might all be familiar with in some way; a standing nude, her back to the artist and a knee resting on a chair with the surrounding environment given reference by a few decisive marks, or a reclining woman gazing boldly off the paper, her upper body and face descriptively rendered while her lower body is described as mere compositional elements by a sweeping mark or two. It is Robinson’s ability to combine bold mark making with areas of tightly rendered detail that imbues his work with great energy and timely relevance. 

Olena Zvyagintseva: TEW has been exhibiting Zvyagintseva’s oil paintings for more than a decade and more recently her pastel and gouache on paper preparatory drawings and sketches. The artist uses her works on paper to explore Ukrainian village life around her and they form an archive of simple daily activities. This most recent body of work distils these simple scenes into an almost primitive motif by using strong color and marks to render forms quite simply.  

 

Opening reception: 6.00 – 9.00 p.m. Friday August 8th, 2014

 

 

 

September 19 - October 17

Yasharel Manzy

Yasharel Manzy

 

 

October 24 - November 21

Dave Wertz & America Martin

 

Dave Wertz 
 

America Martin

 

 

December 5 - January 9

The Figure Today

A Group Show