Atlanta's Leading Contemporary Fine Art Gallery

 

2015 CALENDAR

Previous 2015 Shows


January 23 - February 19
Jean Glenn
Andrew Saftel

March 6 - April 4
A collection of paintings by
Jean de Botton (1898-1978)
Olena Zvyagintseva
Richard Downs

April 23 - May 29
Brian Rutenberg
Deedra Ludwig
 

June 19 - July 10
Group Landscape Show
Greg Gustafson

Brett Deschene
Yasharel Manzy
Eric S. Barr Jewelry – Amy Glasswand

July 24 - August 21
Group Figurative Show
David Eddy

Charles Keiger
Mario Soria
Clem Bedwell

September 18 - October 16
Cathy Hegman
Otto Neumann (1895-1975)

 
October 23 - November 20
Kimo Minton
Melissa Mason
 

December 8 - January 11
Rimi Yang

Review our 2014 shows.

 

April 23 - May 29


Brian Rutenberg
Deedra Ludwig

 

 Brian Rutenberg  "Night Crawler" 215, oil on canvas, 55"x68"

 

 

Deedra Ludwig "Alchemy Botany" 2015, oil on canvas, 48"x48"

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For More Information Contact
Jules Bekker 404.869.0511
jules@tewgalleries.com

Brian Rutenberg, “Iris.”
& “Splendid World” by Deedra Ludwig

Opening Reception: 6.00 – 9.00, April 24, 2015: On Show Through May 30, 2015

Brian Rutenberg opens his 3rd exhibition at TEW on April 24th. Now a highly successful New York artist entering the prime period of his career, we are proud to have the opportunity to exhibit his powerful abstract landscapes which exemplify intense and passionate color harmonies in impasto paint that are redolent of memories of nature in the South. Deedra Ludwig, an accomplished painter currently based in New Orleans, has been showing at TEW since 2007. Her poetic natural harmonies employ jewel like colors and subtle luminosities to create a different, but equally magical interpretation of the world.

Brian Rutenberg, “Iris”.

“First there is a mountain, then there is no mountain, then there is” - Donovan

Brian Rutenberg has said that “Humidity made me a painter.” He was raised in the moist heat of the South Carolina Low Country where his early experience of art came from ancient rivers like the Santee and feeling warm pluff mud squirt between his toes as he ambled the marshes trying to to capture the view in oil paint. “As a child, long before I knew what an artist was, I would scoop up fistfuls of marsh mud, splat it on the dock under the blazing sun, and carefully arrange torn bits of colored construction paper across the muck followed by another handful of mud. The rippled edge of an oyster shell was an ideal tool for skimming off layers of the translucent slime, revealing bits of color of varying intensity. I did this over and over and only decades later recognized how much the directness and simplicity of those experiences taught me about the way a painting comes into being.”

Rutenberg believes that art is the collision of the intellectual with the visceral. “Relying too much on concept or technical facility can come across as academic, even pretentious”, he says, “While spontaneity without the chops to deliver it in tenable form, just feels out of control.” An artist’s job, in Rutenberg’s view; is to align conceptual vision with technical ability until the two merge and become something entirely different. This harmony, he believes, is achieved rather unglamorously by simply showing up at the studio every day and working. “These new landscape paintings, entitled ‘Iris’, embody my continued obsession with the simultaneous discovery of place and the crafting of it.”

 

Deedra Ludwig’s rich and complex paintings are imbued with a gossamer delicacy tied together by radiant light and color, and natural forms as gracious and tenacious as life itself. Her delicately drawn organic subjects float and trail across the canvas surface in all the complex variety we might find if we take the time to intimately explore nature.

Ludwig is a painter whose life has mirrored her art, and vice versa. A one-time organic farmer, a committed environmentalist, and a person with a deep love of nature, and botany in particular, she manages to weave these visual fixations through her work. Her paintings exude an almost spiritual light. Fragmentary plant forms float within the color fields, at times receding into pool-like depths and at others, buoyed by surrounding luminescence, seeming to rise out of the color and project beyond the surface itself. This is only partly visual effect, as Ludwig regularly incorporates actual plant forms into the body of the work by embedding them into thin layers of encaustic so they are both integrated, and on some level, entombed; becoming specimens in the truest sense of the word. In this way, Ludwig celebrates nature while simultaneously preserving and interpreting it. This ‘splendid world’ provides a new level of deeper, richer color than before with mesmerizing results.

 

June 19 - July 10
Group Landscape Show
Greg Gustafson

Brett Deschene
Yasharel Manzy
Eric S. Barr Jewelry – Amy Glasswand

 

July 24 - August 21
Group Figurative Show
David Eddy

Charles Keiger
Mario Soria
Clem Bedwell

 

September 18 - October 16
Cathy Hegman
Otto Neumann (1895-1975)

 

October 23 - November 20
Kimo Minton
Melissa Mason

 

December 8 - January 11
Rimi Yang